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SISTERS AS AUTHORS

OUR CHAPTER OWNS THE BOOKS LISTED BELOW AND THEY ARE ALL AVAILABLE TO BORROW

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GERMAN REUNIFICATION By Joyce Bromley

In 1945, German families with more than 100 hectares (247 acres) of land were forced from their homes in the eastern sector by the Soviets, now in control of that area. These families were brutally evicted from their property and had their land expropriated. In the next 45 years, the GDR government would come to control all of the agricultural land. At reunification in 1990, the earlier abuse of these farmers was compounded when the German government would not restore any of this expropriated land to these families. The German government falsely accused the Soviet Union of insisting on non-restitution as a condition of reunification. Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev unequivocally denies this claim and insists that land issues are a German problem to resolve.

The temporary land-trust agency, established by the German government in 1990 to dispose of land it inherited from the GDR, continues to exist. After 25 years, this agency still holds almost 20 percent of this expropriated land. Its agents, most of whom were reared in GDR, decide who may (or may not) lease land, the conditions of the lease, and if and when a farmer may buy land – circumstances that remain deeply controversial. Joyce Bromley draws on extensive field research, and previously untapped sources, to explore the reliability of the government’s version of these important events. Is the German government once again, without shame, discriminating against a group of its own citizens?

PRAIRIE TIME, THE LEOPOLD RESERVE REVISITED

By John Ross & Beth Ross

In the rush of modern life, we measure our lives by the clock, the calendar, the timetable. But there are older rhythms in nature: the call of chickadees before the first hint of spring, the golden face of a compass plant in July, the first snowfall. These signs mark the passage of time in a world that Aldo Leopold knew well and eloquently described.


With notebook and camera in hand, John and Beth Ross revisit the Aldo Leopold Memorial Reserve in south-central Wisconsin fifty years after Leopold’s death. Thanks to the efforts of Leopold, his family, and the Leopold Foundation, this once-ruined farmland is now largely restored to a natural state. The Rosses explore the terrain of this sandy land, encounter its natural citizens, and relate life here to its physical underpinnings. Following Leopold’s own practice of phenology, they note the seasonal changes: arrivals and departures of wild geese, the blossoming of the pasque flower at the edge of melting snow, the appearance of monarch butterflies on the milkweed. And further, they seek to find in this landscape an underlying morality, a communion of understanding, a sense of place in the cosmos.


Beautifully illustrated with color photographs, the book also includes notes on the behavior, habitat, and human interactions with ninety-four species of plants, birds, and other animals found in the reserve. An extensive glossary explains terms from geology, ecology, meteorology, and related life and earth sciences.

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Book - The Artist's Wife by Betty Bowers

THE ARTIST'S WIFE

By Betty Bowers McMurry

The author recounts her family's lives as they find and renovate their dream 'home away from home' in Door County Wisconsin. For anyone growing up in Door County or Wausau in the 60's this account of one family's life, which was split between both locales, should bring back many fond memories. In addition to being married to an artist, author Betty Bowers is an artist in her own right. Her stories are imaginatively constructed in a manner that makes it easy to paint mental visual illustrations to accompany her prose.

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THE MYSTERIOUS KANGAROO

IT'S ABSOLUTELY TRUE

By Jean Rennebohm

If you think a hospital is a scary place for kids, imagine you're a kangaroo lost in the Wisconsin countryside far from your Australian home.  Former teacher Jean Rennebohm thought hospitalized children and the lonely kangaroo that made headline news around Madison in 2005 might have something in common.

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TO THANK A RIVER

By Jean Clausen

The seasons, flowers, trees, birds, and other animals, the artistry of spider webs, the beauty of sunsets, especially the omnipresence of the river are all interwoven with sincerity and emotion. This book features the best memories of the author's life along the Wisconsin River.

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WE WHO ARE SISTERS

Celebrating 150 years and full of images and stories that tell the story of how P.E.O. came to be the wonderful organization it is today.

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